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5 Mailing Tips for Your Resupply Packages

Organizing and sending out resupply packages before your hike can be tricky. By following these easy tips you should have a stress free day when picking up your package in town.

Paul Bodnar       Educational       8/23/2021
Paul Bodnar
Educational
8/23/2021
a screen shot of how to find USPS Locations

1) Verify the Mailing Address & Hours of Operation

It’s very important that you verify the mailing address and hours of operation prior to sending your package. It is very possible the address or hours of operation has changed.

You can verify mailing addresses for post offices and operating hours at USPS.com

a box being scanned

2) Verify Mailing Method

If you are mailing to a post office, use General Delivery mail through the United States Postal Service. Don’t mail packages to the post office using UPS, FedEx, DHL etc. Some post offices will charge you extra upon receiving the package or they may not even hold your package.

Some businesses only accept mail through the USPS,  so it’s important to verify desired mailing method for each type of business.

post office

3) Check for Storage Fees

Some businesses charge a holding fee per package. This could range from a few dollars to $100 depending on the location. If you mail out a lot of resupply packages, the cost of the holding fee can add up. Sometimes it might be cheaper just to buy the items when you get into town.

a calendar turning pages

4) Verify Delivery Date

Before sending your resupply package, verify the estimated arrival date. Provide enough time to accommodate for an unexpected delay in shipping and make sure that your package will get there before you do.

photo of hiker packages in a mail room

5) Mark Each Side of the Box

Mark each side of the box with your name, estimated time of arrival (ETA), and “Hold for Hiker”.  This will allow the package to be easily identified and retrieved no matter how it is stacked.

photo of hiker packages in a mail room

Make Your Box Easy to Find!

Notice how the other boxes in the photo aren’t labeled correctly. By labeling the side of the resupply box correctly your box can be easily identified among all the other boxes.

Summary

By following these tips and labeling your package correctly, the person receiving your package will be able to store and retrieve it quickly when you arrive. If you improperly label the package, then it’s possible your package will be overlooked in the stack of hundreds of other similar looking packages, or even get lost.


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Photo courtesy of the Tahoe Rim Trail Association

Trail guides that get you to places you’ve dreamed of.

As the makers of Guthook Guides, Bikepacking Guides, and Cyclewayz, we help you navigate the most popular trails around the world on your smartphone. Our hiking guides and biking guides work completely offline. Let Guthook guide your next adventure!

Download our popular hiking and biking guides!
About the Author
A man wearing an Arizona Trail baseball cap stands in a field in front of a mountain.

Paul Bodnar

Paul has always liked hiking and thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail in 1997 after college. After years of working in chemistry, he wanted to create a career involving the outdoors, so he hiked the Pacific Crest Trail again in 2010 to do research for his guide book Pocket PCT. He realized that creating a smartphone app for navigating the outdoors would make it easier to keep the data current and provide a better way to navigate. While hiking with Ryan (aka Guthook) in 2010, they decided to work together to create the first comprehensive smartphone guide for the Pacific Crest Trail. Now with the help of a team of great people they have created over 90 guides for trails around the world.