Central Virginia, Appalachian Trail
Photo by Ryan Linn
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Central Virginia App Mapping

After a day off in Roanoke, I was doing much better than when I’d arrived. My aching and blistered feet were well rested. I had a new pair of sneakers, purchased at the wonderful Walkabout Outfitters (whose manager had driven all the way to Harrisonburg to fetch the right sized sneakers for me, which is pretty amazing). I’d filled myself up with good southern food, loaded my pack with six days worth of trail food, and hit the trail once again.

Ryan Linn       Trip Report       06/07/2014
Ryan Linn
Trip Report
06/07/2014

After a day off in Roanoke, I was doing much better than when I’d arrived. My aching and blistered feet were well rested. I had a new pair of sneakers, purchased at the wonderful Walkabout Outfitters (whose manager had driven all the way to Harrisonburg to fetch the right sized sneakers for me, which is pretty amazing). I’d filled myself up with good southern food, loaded my pack with six days worth of trail food, and hit the trail once again.

The humidity and awful heat of the previous days was now down to a very manageable level, and I was feeling good.

I was now in the section of the Appalachian Trail that runs along the Blue Ridge Parkway, with a few long climbs up to the ridge before walking easily alongside the road. This is a funny section of trail, since many of the best views are roadside pullouts on the parkway, but I’ve also found plenty of gorgeous mountaintops when the trail wanders away from the road.

The first few days, though, I could safely tune out while in the woods, then get the views when I got near the road. That’s kind of unusual for the AT, but it’s a nice that this section has some kind of local flavor.

A distant ridgeline and green forest are visible from the Appalachian Trail.

With my new feet and my new plan to cut my hike short at Harper’s Ferry, I was back to enjoying the trail and just relaxing, even as I averaged about 22 miles a day. I would get up early each morning, walk all day, and arrive in camp around 7 with plenty of daylight hours to rest before bed.

I mostly met new groups of hikers each day, since many of the through-hikers seem to be going a little slower at this point. This surprised me a bit, but it has allowed me to meet a lot of new people, most of whom are pretty awesome.

Halfway through this stretch of trail I met No Plan B and Torch, a father and son duo who were hiking together until NPB injured his foot, so now he’s driving up the trail providing road support for Torch. They’ve both been using the AT Hiker app extensively, and made me really happy when they told me how useful it has been for them.

Check out their website sometime– they’re raising money to build a veterans’ rehab center, and they’re super dedicated to the cause as well as the hike.

Sunlight filters through a lush green forest.

My plan for this 150 mile stretch of trail was to stay in the woods for six days and have the full wilderness experience. Things didn’t quite work out that way, though.

After three days, I realized I wasn’t feeling very connected to the trail, partly because of the number of people I was running into. Last year, while mapping much of the northern section of the AT, I was alone most of the time and really enjoying it. This time, it wasn’t that I didn’t enjoy being out there, but the connection to the trail wasn’t so strong.

I decided I might as well head into town on the fourth night for some burgers and extra snacks. The decision was made a little easier since my food bag was looking just a tiny bit light for the next few days. I made a last minute decision to go into the town of Buena Vista, and arrived at the road to town after all of the day’s traffic had stopped heading over the pass. Maybe this wasn’t such a good idea, I thought.

After half an hour at the road with almost no traffic for hitching, though, the trail provided. A carload of hikers arrived from town to start hiking out at night, and there was my ride into town. It was too late to get a spot at the hostel, but No Plan B and Torch had a campsite at the town park with extra space, so everything worked out just fine.

I got my burgers, then a big breakfast in the morning, and an earlier than expected ride back to the trail, and all was well. The only real backfire of the plan was that with all the town food now in my belly, my food bag had a little too much food. I’d been hoping to walk into Waynesboro with an empty pack.

Oh well. Sometimes when things don’t go according to plan, they work out better than anticipated anyway.

A view from a meadow on a foggy morning shows green trees and distant mountains.
A covering of green plants blankets everything in this forest on the Appalachian Trail.

The last few days to Waynesboro were smooth sailing over some of the last big climbs in the south. The Priest, Cold Mountain, and Three Ridges seemed daunting to everyone out here, but a little time and a lot of sweat were rewarded with much nicer views than I remembered from my last time here.

The temperatures fell steadily as well, making the hiking more pleasant. In the last few miles to the town of Waynesboro, the foliage and undergrowth got thicker and thicker, cutting down on the views, but the surroundings still overwhelmed my senses– the sounds of songbirds singing were louder than ever, and the smell of flowering plants was so thick it seemed like walking through a bouquet.

The final leg of this trip will take me through Shenandoah National Park, and then to the town of Harper’s Ferry, home of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

The terrain is supposedly much easier in the park than elsewhere in Virginia, and with my feet feeling better than ever I could probably be done in less than a week. I’m planning a few extra days, though, just in case I find some interesting side trails or people to spend the last few hiking days with.

As eager as I am to get home, I can always spend a day or two more on the trail.

Hikers sit on a rock outcropping overlooking green hills and a valley.

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The Appalachian Trail is one of the oldest National Scenic Trails in the US. Its path takes you from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mt. Katahdin in Maine.

2200 mi (3540 km)
$59.99 full guide
Learn more
Get our trail guide for this area!
About the Author
A man wears a blue shirt, blue backpack, and a tan baseball cap.

Ryan Linn

Ryan is also known as “Guthook”, which is where our apps get their name. Already an avid hiker, he hiked the Appalachian Trail, New England Trail, and Pacific Crest Trail before joining forces with Paul to create the Guthook Guides apps. Ryan handles iOS development for our apps from his office in Maine, and usually runs away to the forests and mountains throughout New England. He also volunteers with the Maine Appalachian Trail Club and the Natural Resources Council of Maine. Baxter State Park in Maine is his happy place.