Baxter State Park, Maine
Photo by Ryan Linn
Explore a different trail

Walk lush forest paths, rocky coastlines, and towering peaks on New England's trails.

Ancient mountain ranges, deep forests, and thousands of miles of hiking trails await you when you hike in New England. Our hiking guides include Maine’s Baxter State Park, Public Reserved Lands, and Acadia National Park. Mighty peaks in Maine, such as Katahdin and the Bigelows, offer up dramatic views atop rugged climbs, while the coastal hills can be just as wild and beautiful. In our White Mountain National Forest hiking guides, you will find New Hampshire's 48 Four-Thousand Footers, over a thousand miles of hiking trails, and endless possibilities for hiking adventures. The variety of New England trails in many more scenic destinations are perfect for thru-hiking, section-hiking, day-hiking, or backpacking.

10 sections ($0 to $9.99 each)       Acadia National Park       The Bigelow Range       … and more!
10 sections ($0 to $9.99 each)
Acadia National Park
The Bigelow Range
… and more!
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Works Offline, No Data Required

Once you’ve completed the initial setup of the app, all of our trail guides work offline. They use your device’s internal GPS to display your current location and guide you along the route. Offline use includes access to the key features of the guide, including the map, elevation profile, waypoint list, and more.

Trusted Trail Data

All of the data for our routes is collected by trusted individuals and partners, and is kept meticulously up to date. The track of each trail includes side trails and alternate routes, along with key waypoints. Our apps also offer comprehensive town guides, helping you resupply and access other services quickly.

Built for Community

Stay informed about trail conditions ahead by reading other hikers’ waypoint comments, and let other hikers know about your experience by leaving your own comments. Keep your friends and family up to date by sharing your current location from a Google Maps link sent via email or text message.

Offline Maps

Our variety of offline map sets, optionally downloaded as part of the initial setup and accessible offline afterwards, can give you extra quality information such as topographic lines with elevation values and satellite imagery.

Detailed Waypoints

Waypoints are plotted on a map and elevation profile, and each includes its own detail page with photos and descriptions. Water waypoints offer the most up-to-date water information, gathered from trusted sources and checked by other users.

Tailored to You

Plan your day by letting the app calculate the distance to the next campsite, water source, or other waypoint. Not every hike is the same, and we know that. Create your own custom routes using our route builder tool.

Works Offline, No Data Required

Once you’ve completed the initial setup of the app, all of our trail guides work offline. They use your device’s internal GPS to display your current location and guide you along the route. Offline use includes access to the key features of the guide, including the map, elevation profile, waypoint list, and more.

Our variety of offline map sets, optionally downloaded as part of the initial setup and accessible offline afterwards, can give you extra quality information such as topographic lines with elevation values and satellite imagery.

Trusted Trail Data

All of the data for our routes is collected by trusted individuals and partners, and is kept meticulously up to date. The track of each trail includes side trails and alternate routes, along with key waypoints. Our apps also offer comprehensive town guides, helping you resupply and access other services quickly.

Waypoints are plotted on a map and elevation profile, and each includes its own detail page with photos and descriptions. Water waypoints offer the most up-to-date water information, gathered from trusted sources and checked by other users.

Built for Community, Tailored to You

Stay informed about trail conditions ahead by reading other hikers’ waypoint comments, and let other hikers know about your experience by leaving your own comments. Keep your friends and family up to date by sharing your current location from a Google Maps link sent via email or text message.

Plan your day by letting the app calculate the distance to the next campsite, water source, or other waypoint. Not every hike is the same, and we know that. Create your own custom routes using our route builder tool.

How can I buy it?

On iOS devices, this hiking guide is available as an in-app purchase via our Guthook Guides app, a free download from the Apple App Store.

On Android devices, this hiking guide is available for purchase through the Google Play Store.

Download in the App StoreGet it on Google Play

This bundle includes all of our guides to Maine’s State Parks, Public Reserved Lands, and Acadia National Park.

 

With the mountains in the west and north, the rugged coastline, and the rivers and lakes in between, Maine can be a hiker’s paradise if you take a little time to explore. Mighty peaks like Katahdin and the Bigelows offer up dramatic views atop rugged climbs, while the coastal hills can be just as wild and beautiful, a little closer to villages and towns.

$29.99

This bundle includes all of our guide sections for the White Mountain National Forest, home of New Hampshire’s highest peaks. Mount Washington and the Presidential Range are some of the most rugged and impressive peaks on the east coast, and have been a mecca for outdoor recreation for generations.

In the White Mountains, you will find New Hampshire’s 48 Four-Thousand Footers, over a thousand miles of hiking trails, and endless possibilities for hiking adventures.

$29.99

The first National Park east of the Mississippi, Acadia is a paradise for hikers, bikers, and sightseers on the low mountains of Mt Desert Island. This guide includes all hiking trails and carriage roads within the park, plus some trails that stretch outside the park.

$7.99

One of the crown jewels of Maine’s outdoors, Baxter State Park is home to the state’s highest peak, Mt Katahdin, as well as several other rugged mountains, dozens of lakes and ponds, several major streams, and some of the deepest wilderness in the state. Most visitors come to either camp in the pristine campgrounds around the park, or to climb Katahdin (which is also the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail). Whatever your plan, the Park is worth as much time as you can afford to spend there.

NOTE: The trails of the Scientific Forest Management Area, and for the Katahdin Lake area, have not been added to this guide yet. All other trails are available.

ALSO: This app is not affiliated with Baxter State Park in any way. Please visit www.baxterstatepark.org for more details on visiting the Park before you go.

$9.99

The rocky, coastal mountains of the Camden Hills form a beautiful backdrop to the towns of Camden, Rockport, and Lincolnville on Penobscot Bay. The Camden Hills State Park, which encompasses most of the mountainous area, boasts over 30 miles of hiking trails on five prominent peaks, while the George’s Highland Path provides another set of trails on three more mountains. Despite providing extraordinary views over the ocean and several nearby lakes, the crowds on the mountaintops here are much smaller than similar coastal mountains in Acadia National Park, making the Camden Hills one of the highlights of Maine’s State Parks system.

The State Park is also home to a very nice campground, which provides a peaceful and inexpensive alternative to the fine lodging along much of the rest of the Midcoast region.

$2.99

At 4083 feet in elevation, Camel’s Hump is tied with Mt Ellen as the third-highest peak in Vermont, but it is certainly the most remarkable. The peak is the highest in the state without a ski resort, and its distinctive shape makes it easy to identify from Burlington, Montpelier, and many other towns in the northern part of the state. Most importantly for this guide’s purposes, though, the mountain is one of the most rewarding places to hike in the entire state.

The section of The Long Trail that traverses Camel’s Hump and the Monroe Skyline is consistently rated as a highlight of the trail, while the Monroe Trail and Burrows Trail provide shorter day-hike options from the east and west. Three backcountry campsites and a gorgeous forest round out the area as one of the most spectacular mountains in New England.

FREE

One of the highlights of the Maine Public Reserved Lands system, the Cutler Coast Unit is a 12,000 acre coastal forest that includes a 10-mile loop trail and primitive campsites on the rocky ocean shore. Visitors can take a short day hike to the tall cliffs over the Bay of Fundy, or walk several miles along the ledges and coves. The inland part of the loop trail also features blueberry barrens and peat bogs, providing a scenic and tranquil walk through the Downeast coastal forest.

$3.99

The Donnell Pond unit is one of the highlights of Maine’s Public Reserve Lands, and is a less busy alternative to the nearby Acadia National Park trails. An 8-mile loop trail over two mountains, and two out-and-back mountain trails, along with several ponds and three large lakes, all combine to make this a hidden gem in Downeast Maine. This guide only covers the hiking trails of the public land, as well as the campsites connected by them, but there are also several canoeing options in the area as well (see Maine Bureau of Public Lands’ website for more details).

$3.99

Glastenbury Mountain is a high peak of Southern Vermont, well known to Long Trail and Appalachian Trail hikers for its scenic fire tower. A loop trail that connects to the LT also provides for a good weekend backpacking trip, and day-hikes to Bald Mountain over the town of Bennington.

$3.99

A joint effort between the Appalachian Mountain Club and the Maine Appalachian Trail Club, the Grafton Loop Trail was completed around 2007 as an approximately 40 mile backpacking loop trail on either side of Grafton Notch State Park in Maine. The trail is extremely rugged, but offers some of the finest scenery in New England, climbing over four open peaks, several more open ledges, and crossing several woodland creeks. More than half a dozen backcountry campsites allow backpackers to split the trip up in many different ways.

Though the trail is a long loop, there are several options for hiking trips here. Two trailheads allow backpackers to split the loop into two halves, while several shorter day-hike options reach the many fine peaks.

$4.99

The Grand Canyon of Maine, Gulf Hagas (pronounced “hay-gus”) is a series of deep gorges and waterfalls along the West Branch of the Pleasant River. While many Appalachian Trail hikers stop to see one or two scenic waterfalls, day-hikers can access more than half a dozen with a good day’s hike.

FREE

Vermont’s second-highest mountain and the largest ski resort in the northeast, Killington Peak offers a variety of outdoor recreation opportunities. For hikers, the twin peaks of Killington and Pico are home to several day-hikes, as well as a possibility of a weekend-long backpacking trip on the Long Trail and Sherburne Pass Trail.

This guide includes the Bucklin Trail up Killington, the Sherburne Pass Trail, and the trails on Deer Leap Mountain.

FREE

Moat Mountain is one of the most prominent peaks visible from the popular tourist town of North Conway, NH. The three peaks of this mountain are home to several hiking trails, with wonderful views of the southeastern White Mountains and the Saco River Valley.

This guide also includes the Attitash Trail over Big Attitash Mountain and Table Mountain.

FREE

The tallest mountain in southern New Hampshire is also the most frequently hiked mountain in America. Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson popularized the mountain in the 1800s, drawing crowds from New York and Boston to the rugged beauty of the bald peak.

Today, Monadnock is the centerpiece of Monadnock State Park, with over forty miles of hiking trails, a campground, and some of the best views in the state.

FREE

A 45-mile backpacking trail linking two of southern New Hampshire’s most popular peaks, the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway Trail (MSGT) showcases the rural hills and forests of the southwest portion of the state. The trail wanders from the ski-resort summit of Mount Sunapee, along scenic ridges, through tiny villages, and along quiet lakes to the summit of Mount Monadnock, the most popular hiking destination in the United States.

With six backcountry campsites and dozens of beautiful views along the length of the trail, the MSGT is a very popular backpacking trip for younger hikers, people new to backpacking, or experienced backpackers looking for a fun trip for a long weekend.

$4.99

Vermont’s highest peak, Mount Mansfield is home to many wonderful hiking trails on exposed alpine peaks, including the first section of The Long Trail. Views from The Chin (the highest point on the mountain) are some of the most spectacular in the state, taking in the Adirondack Mountains of New York and the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Other parts of the mountain are also known for spectacular scenery, rugged trails, and beautiful campsites.

The variety of hiking trails from Underhill State Park on the west side of the mountain, and from Smuggler’s Notch and the town of Stowe to the east, make for countless day-hikes and several backpacking trip opportunities.

FREE

Mount Sunapee, located just south of Lake Sunapee in southern New Hampshire, is one of the state’s most popular ski resorts as well as a delightful hiking destination. There are several hiking trails that make their way to the summit of the mountain, as well as to an alpine lake near the summit. The mountain is also home to a New Hampshire State Park campground, making this a great destination for summer vacationers.

FREE

Mt Abraham is one of Maine’s highest peaks, and also boasts the state’s second largest alpine zone, which means it has an extensive summit above tree line. The mountain is less easily accessed than some other nearby mountains, but the Fire Warden’s Trail is a good day hike with amazing rewards.

FREE

Pillsbury State Park is a relatively remote park in southwestern New Hampshire, remarkable for its several lakes and wild campground. The park is mostly popular as a place to canoe and kayak, or go camping, but it is also home to several fine hiking trails with fine views of the region.

FREE

The region of the Green Mountain National Forest that extends from the edge of town in Manchester to the seventh-highest peak in Vermont is home to some of the state’s most beloved backcountry. The Appalachian Trail and Long Trail traverse Stratton Mountain, the shore of Stratton Pond, and the Lye Brook Wilderness for about 15 miles, making this area a prime destination for hikers. But there’s much more to see beyond the AT and LT as well.

Stratton Pond, Bourn Pond, and Branch Pond have several campsites and access points for paddlers and hikers. The spectacular Lye Brook Falls, Prospect Rock, and Spruce Peak have wonderful views with shorter hikes. Trails from all directions provide opportunities for countless backpacking trips and day-hikes. Exploring this area can take many days of hiking, and all of it is worth many visits.

FREE

The area between Rangeley, Stratton, and Kingfield is home to ten of Maine’s fourteen 4000-Foot peaks, and a huge array of hiking, mountain biking, paddling, and skiing opportunities. Hiking trails on 9 of the ten major peaks are included in this guide (Mt Redington has no official trail to the top, so we leave it to the hardiest adventurers to find). The area has long been known as a winter recreation mecca, with the Sugarloaf ski resort drawing skiers from all over the world. More recently, the Appalachian Trail, the Bigelow Preserve, and the Maine Huts and Trails network have all added to the appeal.

Trail systems currently found in this app are as follows:

-The Appalachian Trail from ME Route 4 to Long Falls Dam Road

-The hiking trails of the Bigelow Preserve

-The Berry Picker’s Trail on Saddleback Mountain

-The Fire Warden’s Trail on Mt Abraham

More will be added in the future!

$5.99

The Tully Trail is a remote and beautiful 22-mile loop through western Massachusetts, encircling the valley of Tully River and Tully Lake.

The trail, along with various side trails, has many opportunities for day hikes and a good weekend backpacking trip. A campground on the shores of Tully Lake also makes for a great getaway.

$3.99

This remote mountain range outside the town of Weld has been popular among hikers since the early 20th century due to the alpine pond on the ridge of Tumbledown Mountain, and the stunning cliffs overlooking the Weld Valley.

Since 2002, the land around the mountains has been protected by conservation easements and is now operated as a multiple-use forest, but it remains one of Maine’s premiere hiking destinations for hikers of all abilities.

FREE

The Western region of the White Mountains includes all major trails west of Interstate 93 and east of Route 25. 4000-Footers Mt Moosilauke, South Kinsman, North Kinsman, and Cannon are highlights, along with Lonesome Lake Hut and the Kinsman Ridge traverse. Also of note are the trails in the Three Ponds area, and several short trails to less-traveled peaks like Rattlesnake Mountain, Stinson Mountain, and Blueberry Mountain. In all, there are about 130 miles of hiking trails in this guide.

$6.99

The region of the White Mountain National Forest surrounding the Pemigewasset Wilderness includes seventeen of New Hampshire’s 4000 Footers (Franconia Ridge, Twins, Bonds, Carrigain, Hancocks, Zealand, Willey Range, and Garfield), as well as several popular campsites, waterfalls, and high mountain ponds.

This section includes all major trails bounded by Route 3, Route 302, the Kancamagus Highway, and Bear Notch Road— a total of nearly 200 miles of trail.

$6.99

Mount Washington and the Presidential Range of New Hampshire’s White Mountains are the highest and most daunting mountains of the northeast. The area contains eight of New Hampshire’s 4000-footers, 3 AMC Huts, and around 250 miles of hiking trails.

$6.99

The region of the White Mountain National Forest south of the Kancamagus Highway and generally around the Sandwich Range Wilderness includes seven of New Hampshire’s 4000 Footers (Tecumseh, the Osceolas, the Tripyramids, Whiteface and Passaconaway), as well as one of the highlights of the Whites, Mt Chocorua.

This section includes about 220 miles of trails, bounded by Route 112 (The Kancamagus Highway) to the north, and US Route 3 and Interstate 93 to the west.

$6.99

The region of the White Mountain National Forest surrounding the Wild River Wilderness includes six of New Hampshire’s 4000 Footers (the Wildcat Range and the Carter-Moriah Range), as well as the popular Baldface Range, Kearsarge North, and many fine campgrounds and backpacking trails.

This section includes about 150 miles of trails, bounded by US Route 2 to the north, Routes 16 and 113 to the west and east, and the town of North Conway to the south.

$6.99

One of the quietest parts of the White Mountains, the Caribou-Speckled Mountain Wilderness and its surroundings east of Route 113 are almost entirely within the state of Maine, and top out at around 2900 feet in elevation. But the size of the hills here belie the beautiful scenery and lovely views from the wilderness area’s namesake mountains, as well as Blueberry Ledge, Deer Hill, and Albany Mountain.

Also home to the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Cold River Camp, this is a great area for lighter day-hikes and escapes from the more crowded high peaks of the Whites.

$4.99

The Worcester Mountain Range is a tall series of mountains that separate the towns of Stowe and Waterbury from Montpelier and Worcester. Several of the peaks in the range are popular hiking destinations due to the open, rocky summits with extraordinary views. Peaks like Stowe Pinnacle and Hunger Mountain provide a range of difficulties and plenty of fine views.

$2.99