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The Best Plastic Sealable Bags to Take on Your Thru-Hike

Plastic sealable bags are a great way to organize your food and gear without adding a lot of weight. Sealable bags can also keep valuable electronics like your smartphone or e-reader safe from the elements. Picking the right sealable bag for the task can save you some weight. Find out which bag is best for you!

Paul Bodnar       Educational       8/10/2021
Paul Bodnar
Educational
8/10/2021
A small ziploc baggie being measured on a desk

Small Seal Top Bags

Use small sealable bags for your super small items. These bags are great for storing small items like cotton swabs, bandages, etc. You can save 4 grams by using a small, thin bag instead of a thicker quart sized bag.

Weight: 1.7 grams (0.06 ounces)

Size: 6.5 inches by 3.25 inches

Measured Volume: 0.28 liters

Measured Thickness: 0.00125 inches

Ziploc® Snack Bags

A medium ziploc baggie being measured

Large Seal Top Bags

Use the thin large type of sealable bags for those larger items that don’t need to be stored for a long time. The thin plastic will not be as durable as other bags with thicker plastic. These bags are great for storing food items that will be consumed quickly on trail. These bags are very useful because of the high carrying capacity and light weight.

Weight: 2.8 grams (0.1 ounces)

Size: 7 inches by 8 inches

Measured Volume: 1.3 liters

Measured Thickness: 0.0010 inches

Ziploc® XL Sandwich Bag

A medium ziploc baggie being measured

Quart Storage Seal Top Bags

The quart sized storage bags are very practical because of the large size and the thicker plastic walls. The storage bags will keep food fresher and be a lot more durable than than the thinner snack and sandwich bags. The quart sized storage bags can replace a lot of heavier duffel type bags that are commonly carried.

Weight: 5.7 grams (0.20ounces)

Size: 7 inches by 7.75 inches

Measured Volume: 1.2 liters

Measured Thickness: 0.0019 inches

Glad® Storage Bag

A hefty bag being measured

Gallon Storage Seal Top Bags

The large gallon storage bags can be used for things like doing laundry or organizing a days worth of food. Because of the heavier weight of a gallon storage bag you should consider limiting the number of these in your pack.

Weight: 9.7 grams (0.31 ounces)

Size: 10.56 inches by 9.31 inches

Measured Volume: 3.8 liters

Measured Thickness: 0.0023 inches

Hefty® Gallon Storage Slider Bag

Summary

Plastic sealable bags are a great way to organize your food and gear without adding a lot of weight to your pack. Sealable bags can also keep your electronics safe from the rain or snow. Thicker sealable bags are more durable and will keep food fresher and be more durable. However, the thicker and more durable bags weigh more than the thinner bags. By picking the right type of sealable bag for your specific needs, you should be able to keep your food fresh and your supplies organized and safe from the elements.


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Photo courtesy of the Tahoe Rim Trail Association
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Showers Lake Vista, Tahoe Rim Trail
Photo courtesy of the Tahoe Rim Trail Association

Trail guides that get you to places you’ve dreamed of.

As the makers of Guthook Guides, Bikepacking Guides, and Cyclewayz, we help you navigate the most popular trails around the world on your smartphone. Our hiking guides and biking guides work completely offline. Let Guthook guide your next adventure!

Download our popular hiking and biking guides!
About the Author
A man wearing an Arizona Trail baseball cap stands in a field in front of a mountain.

Paul Bodnar

Paul has always liked hiking and thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail in 1997 after college. After years of working in chemistry, he wanted to create a career involving the outdoors, so he hiked the Pacific Crest Trail again in 2010 to do research for his guide book Pocket PCT. He realized that creating a smartphone app for navigating the outdoors would make it easier to keep the data current and provide a better way to navigate. While hiking with Ryan (aka Guthook) in 2010, they decided to work together to create the first comprehensive smartphone guide for the Pacific Crest Trail. Now with the help of a team of great people they have created over 90 guides for trails around the world.