Looking back from a crossing of the Popo Agie River.
Photo by Ryan Linn
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Wind River Peak

After finishing the NOLS course, I went right back out into the mountains for a short trip to climb a peak we had passed by on the course. Wind River Peak, at 13,192 feet, is the highest peak in the southern portion of the Wind River Range, and was a prominent landmark for the first several days of the NOLS course.

Ryan Linn       Trip Report       08/19/2016
Ryan Linn
Trip Report
08/19/2016

After finishing the NOLS course in the Wind River Range, I went right back out into the mountains for a short trip with a college friend to climb a peak we had passed by on the course. Wind River Peak, at 13,192 feet, is the highest peak in the southern portion of the Wind River Range, and was a prominent landmark for the first several days of the NOLS course as we walk below it.

As the topo map shows, the ascent to the summit is amazingly straightforward from the northeast along a feature I heard referred to as “The Ramp.” I’m sure you can guess what that is by the map snippet below.

A topographic map of the Wind River Range.

It was a straightforward hike, but certainly not an easy one, especially as we brought our packs up and over the peak, dropping down the south side of the mountain to Tayo Lake.

The descent was also fairly simple, if time-consuming due to picking our way across boulder fields for a few miles. We were rewarded at the end of the descent with the icy waters of Tayo Lake, and a freshly-maintained trail heading down to the valley. A volunteer crew from the Sierra Club was on a work trip for the week, which certainly helped speed up the end of the day for us.

I’ll let the pictures do the rest of the talking here, since as I write this I’m still getting adjusted to life at home after all that time in the mountains. From the summit, there are plenty of views across much of the range, and I could see plenty of places I know I’ll have to visit again later.

A distand mountain is reflected in a clear lake.
Second Deep Creek Lake at the base of Wind River Peak.
Photo by Ryan Linn
A blue lake sits in front of an imposing mountainside.
Third Deep Creek Lake below the cliffs of Wind River Peak.
Photo by Ryan Linn
Blue skies and rocks showcase a mountainous ridgeline.
Temple Mountain and Frozen Lakes from the summit of Wind River Peak.
Photo by Ryan Linn
A view from a ridgeline shows a blue lake nestled in imposing rocky ridgelines.
Tayo Lake from the long descent of Wind River.
Photo by Ryan Linn

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Hike the length of the Rockies from tundra to desert on the Continental Divide Trail.

Considered by many to be the most remote and challenging of the Triple Crown trails, the Continental Divide Trail is a 3100 mile (4980 km) adventure from Mexico to Canada, traveling through five western states. It passes through many ecosystems, 25 National Forests, 21 Wilderness Areas, 3 National Parks, and 1 National Monument. The CDT offers an incredible experience to all who visit, including thru-hikers, section-hikers, and day-hikers. Our data for the Continental Divide Trail guide was collected in partnership with Bear Creek Survey Service, LLC and is updated by the Continental Divide Trail Collation. For more information about Bear Creek’s work, visit their website at bearcreeksurvey.com!

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Wyoming, Continental Divide Trail
Photo by David Getchel
Wyoming, Continental Divide Trail
Photo by David Getchel
Get our hiking guide for this area!

Hike the length of the Rockies from tundra to desert on the Continental Divide Trail.

Considered by many to be the most remote and challenging of the Triple Crown trails, the Continental Divide Trail is a 3100 mile (4980 km) adventure from Mexico to Canada, traveling through five western states. It passes through many ecosystems, 25 National Forests, 21 Wilderness Areas, 3 National Parks, and 1 National Monument. The CDT offers an incredible experience to all who visit, including thru-hikers, section-hikers, and day-hikers. Our data for the Continental Divide Trail guide was collected in partnership with Bear Creek Survey Service, LLC and is updated by the Continental Divide Trail Collation. For more information about Bear Creek’s work, visit their website at bearcreeksurvey.com!

3100 mi (4980 km)
$39.99 full guide
5 sections ($9.99 each)
Official App
Explore the Continental Divide Trail
About the Author
A man wearing a backpack and carrying trekking poles stands on top of a rock cliff with a view behind him.

Ryan Linn

Ryan is also known as “Guthook”, which is where our apps get their name. Already an avid hiker, he hiked the Appalachian Trail, New England Trail, and Pacific Crest Trail before joining forces with Paul to create the Guthook Guides apps. Ryan handles iOS development for our apps from his office in Maine, and usually runs away to the forests and mountains throughout New England. He also volunteers with the Maine Appalachian Trail Club and the Natural Resources Council of Maine. Baxter State Park in Maine is his happy place.